The City That Became Safe New York s Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control The forty percent drop in crime that occurred across the U S from to remains largely an unsolved mystery Even puzzling is the eighty percent drop over nineteen years in New York City Twice a

  • Title: The City That Became Safe: New York's Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control
  • Author: Franklin E. Zimring
  • ISBN: 9780199844425
  • Page: 348
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The forty percent drop in crime that occurred across the U.S from 1991 to 2000 remains largely an unsolved mystery Even puzzling is the eighty percent drop over nineteen years in New York City Twice as long and twice as large, it is the largest crime decline on record.In The City That Became Safe, Franklin E Zimring seeks out the New York difference through a compThe forty percent drop in crime that occurred across the U.S from 1991 to 2000 remains largely an unsolved mystery Even puzzling is the eighty percent drop over nineteen years in New York City Twice as long and twice as large, it is the largest crime decline on record.In The City That Became Safe, Franklin E Zimring seeks out the New York difference through a comprehensive investigation into the city s falling crime rates The usual understanding is that aggressive police created a zero tolerance law enforcement regime that drove crime rates down Is this political sound bite true are the official statistics generated by the police accurate Though zero tolerance policing and quality of life were never a consistent part of the NYPD s strategy, Zimring shows the numbers are correct and argues that some combination of cops, new tactics, and new management can take some credit for the decline That the police can make a difference at all in preventing crime overturns decades of conventional wisdom from criminologists, but Zimring also points out what most experts have missed the New York experience challenges the basic assumptions driving American crime and drug control policies.New York has shown that crime rates can be greatly reduced without increasing prison populations New York teaches that targeted harm reduction strategies can drastically cut down on drug related violence even if illegal drug use remains high And New York has proven that epidemic levels of violent crime are not hard wired into the populations or cultures of urban America This careful and penetrating analysis of how the nation s largest city became safe rewrites the playbook on crime and its control for all big cities.

    The city that won t stop growing BBC News Aug , There s an uninterrupted view of the city s dramatic sprawl of poverty from the road bridges that carry daily commuters between the islands and the mainland. Meet Plumber Vinnie Giurbino, NYCHA s Overtime King May , It appears that proved a very busy year for Vincenzo Giurbino, a plumber with the New York City Housing Authority The year old city worker s payroll numbers indicated he put in an average hour day every single day he worked reaping him List of nicknames for Chicago City by the Lake Used as early as the s City in a Garden English translation of the Latin motto on the city seal Urbs in Horto The City that Works A slogan from Mayor Richard J Daley s tenure as mayor, describing Chicago as a blue collar, hard working city, which ran relatively smoothly. List of city nicknames in the United States This partial list of city nicknames in the United States compiles the aliases, sobriquets and slogans that cities are known by or have been known by historically , officially and unofficially, to municipal governments, local people, outsiders or their tourism boards or chambers of commerce. City The most populated city proper is Shanghai while the most populous metropolitan areas are the Greater Tokyo Area, the Shanghai area, and Jabodetabek Jakarta The cities of Faiyum, Damascus, and Varanasi are among those laying claim to longest continual inhabitation. Young OG City That Made Me Prod By Dev Dhokia Official Aug , Mix Young OG City That Made Me Prod By Dev Dhokia Official Music Video YouTube Kilo Chapo Ft Young OG Wolves Music Video Duration . The City That Never Sleeps The City That Never Sleeps, or NY Nunca Duerme Reality Show, a TV show The City That Never Sleeps , a episode of the American TV series Blue Bloods The City That Never Sleeps, a exhibition in New York featuring photographer Ruth Orkin The City That Never Sleeps, a book of artwork by Archer Prewitt The City Cancun s Nightlife Authority since Partying at The City is one of those things that you need to put on your bucket list Every night is a new possibility for the Partyholics who visit us We re responsible for filling the schedule with the best events and of course the best DJs from around the world. Never built New York the city that might have been in Jan , From an elevated th century pneumatic railway to a skyscraper cathedral and a Native American alternative to the Statue of Liberty, Never Built New York chronicles ambitious plans for the city CityLab Through original reporting, sharp analysis, and visual storytelling, CityLab informs and inspires the people who are creating the cities of the future and those who want to live there.

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    1. Franklin E. Zimring

      Franklin E. Zimring Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The City That Became Safe: New York's Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control book, this is one of the most wanted Franklin E. Zimring author readers around the world.

    588 thoughts on “The City That Became Safe: New York's Lessons for Urban Crime and Its Control”

    1. Zimring is far from an eloquent writer. The structure of each chapter and subsection begins something like this: I will first talk about A, second I will talk about B, third I will talk about C. This becomes stale very quickly, as does the endless reporting of statistics which are very well represented in equally abundant graphs. All this said, as professor in a Criminal Justice department, I think this book should be required reading for every undergraduate entering a Criminal Justice major. It [...]


    2. "By 2010, the crime rate in New York had seen its greatest decline since the Second World War; in 2002, there were fewer murders in Manhattan than there had been in any year since 1900. In social science, a cause sought is usually a muddle found; in life as we experience it, a crisis resolved is causality established. If a pill cures a headache, we do not ask too often if the headache might have gone away by itself. All this ought to make the publication of Franklin E. Zimring’s new book, “T [...]


    3. Although mainly composed of endless facts, stats, tables, and bar graphs, this book does at least show how stark New York City's crime decline has been, and eliminates many of the typical explanations for it.First, many say that New York was just part of the great crime decline of the 1990s in the US (the subject of Zimring's previous book), but nationwide the number of seven "index crimes" (homicide, aggravated assault, rape, larceny theft, auto theft, burglary, and robbery) dropped 40% since 1 [...]


    4. "New York's very low rates have happened in a setting of populations that usually have higher victimizations. This makes a remarkable statistical achievement even more remarkable when considered in demographic perspective." (42)"The remarkable capacity of the country's largest city to make huge strides in crime reduction without increasing investment in confinement has yet to become an important issues in crime control policy discourse but perhaps it should." (75)"Compstat was not merely a metho [...]


    5. An incredibly dry and wonkish study of NYC's plummeting crime rates. Still an essential and informative for historians of policing, crime as well as criminologists, sociologists and social workers. Zimring challenges past policing scholars like James Q. Wilson and his "Broken Windows" theory and suggests that the NYPD did the exact opposite; police problem areas harder. Zimring comes to an uncomfortable, and very problematic, conclusion: stop-and-frisk policies perhaps have been a benefit to con [...]


    6. Crime rates throughout the United States dropped significantly in the 1990s (by about 40 percent). Crime rates in New York City dropped even faster than the national average and continued to decline in the 2000s, leading to a decrease of about 80 percent in less than two decades.What is the reason for this astonishing decline? No one really knows. Popular theories (policing, imprisonment, demographics, economics) explain less than half of the decline, even when stacked together. While the dramat [...]


    7. Chock full of data, charts and diagrams, it's not an easy book to read. On the other hand, empirical data shows the easy explanations and easy fixes for crime to be just that. New York's crime rate went down 80% from the 1990's to the present and has stayed that way! Nothing about the city had had changed in terms of demographic, number of incarcerations (in fact, more people being discharged than jailed). What seems to have made much of the difference is policing. The authors found that adding [...]


    8. Excellent analysis of the drop in crime in New York from 1990 - 2009. Central point is that certain changes in police protocol were the main drivers of the drop in crime after he considers changing demographics and social factors could not have played that large of a role. Relevant today when there are discussions over aggressive police tactics including pretextual arrests and stop-and-frisk stops.Analysis is great but the writing could have been improved and used a better editor (sometimes cita [...]


    9. A masterpiece of policy analysis, especially Chapter 5, which details and evaluates methodically a wide range of reforms—organizational, tactical, and more—to policing in New York City. While clear, chockfull of helpful charts and tables, and sometimes amusing, it’s a real slog of a read. In the end, though, it’s well worth the effort. Even readers knowledgable on crime and crime policy are likely to have their preconceptions challenged by this cogent, hyper-analytic unpacking of New Yor [...]


    10. More dry and academic than I would have preferred. Lots of fascinating statistics about the unprecedented drop in crime over the last 20 years in NYC, but no stories, no characters to remember. Here's the whole book in two sentences: Crime dropped by 40% across the US in the 90's and nobody knows why. Crime continued to drop by another 40% in NYC in the oughts and we think maybe it had something to do with policing?




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