Ethnography After Antiquity Foreign Lands and Peoples in Byzantine Literature Although Greek and Roman authors wrote ethnographic texts describing foreign cultures ethnography seems to disappear from Byzantine literature after the seventh century C E a perplexing exception for

  • Title: Ethnography After Antiquity: Foreign Lands and Peoples in Byzantine Literature
  • Author: Anthony Kaldellis
  • ISBN: 9780812208405
  • Page: 380
  • Format: ebook
  • Although Greek and Roman authors wrote ethnographic texts describing foreign cultures, ethnography seems to disappear from Byzantine literature after the seventh century C.E a perplexing exception for a culture so strongly self identified with the Roman empire Yet the Byzantines, geographically located at the heart of the upheavals that led from the ancient to the moderAlthough Greek and Roman authors wrote ethnographic texts describing foreign cultures, ethnography seems to disappear from Byzantine literature after the seventh century C.E a perplexing exception for a culture so strongly self identified with the Roman empire Yet the Byzantines, geographically located at the heart of the upheavals that led from the ancient to the modern world, had abundant and sophisticated knowledge of the cultures with which they struggled and bargained Ethnography After Antiquity examines both the instances and omissions of Byzantine ethnography, exploring the political and religious motivations for writing or not writing about other peoples.Through the ethnographies embedded in classical histories, military manuals, Constantine VII s De administrando imperio, and religious literature, Anthony Kaldellis shows Byzantine authors using accounts of foreign cultures as vehicles to critique their own state or to demonstrate Romano Christian superiority over Islam He comes to the startling conclusion that the Byzantines did not view cultural differences through a purely theological prism their Roman identity, rather than their orthodoxy, was the vital distinction from cultures they considered heretic and barbarian Filling in the previously unexplained gap between antiquity and the resurgence of ethnography in the late Byzantine period, Ethnography After Antiquity offers new perspective on how Byzantium positioned itself with and against the dramatically shifting world.

    • Ý Ethnography After Antiquity: Foreign Lands and Peoples in Byzantine Literature || ↠ PDF Read by ✓ Anthony Kaldellis
      380 Anthony Kaldellis
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      Posted by:Anthony Kaldellis
      Published :2019-04-13T07:31:40+00:00

    About "Anthony Kaldellis"

    1. Anthony Kaldellis

      Ph.D University of Michigan, Department of History 2001

    791 thoughts on “Ethnography After Antiquity: Foreign Lands and Peoples in Byzantine Literature”

    1. A wonderful historian who seems to write a great deal, and this told me everything I need to know (in the first instance) about Byzantine writings on Turks and Mongols. He offers thought-provoking suggestions on why the Byzantines 'knew a lot about barbarians but wrote little'. It's an enormous pity they didn't, but here is a guide to what they did write. With the attitudes and structures of thought that might 'interpret the silence.' This subject has not been gone into because of that silence, [...]


    2. Kaldellis sets out to find out what happened in the middle Byzantine period to ethnographic writing. Whereas classical and late antique writing contained plenty of insights into foreign peoples for the purpose of holding a mirror to Roman civilization, Byzantine writers ignore the outsider. Kaldellis finds this puzzling since it is evident that the Byzantines made an effort to remain informed about the world and would have known a lot. He argues that ancient ethnography became religious polemic [...]


    3. Another Kaldellis book, who is rapidly becoming my favourite active Byzantinist. This book has a rather odd aim in that, unlike many academic studies, it is trying to explain a absence, rather than a presence. In the case of this book, it is the disappearance of ethnography as a literary (sub-) genre. Key to this discussion, of course, is just what Kaldellis identifies as ethnography, which is classisizing ethnographies so familiar to Greek and Roman historiography which tended to include a pret [...]


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